Advantages of an Uncontested Divorce

Divorce can either be contested or uncontested. Contested divorce is for those who have issues with the divorce itself or its terms, such as child custody, child support, spousal support, and division of assets and liabilities. Uncontested divorce is for those who agree on the divorce itself and its terms.

Contesting a divorce may be necessary, as it can affect your life in terms of spousal relationship, children relationship, acquired assets, and other financial aspects. But sometimes, taking an uncontested divorce is the better choice because of its advantages.

Lower Costs
Contested divorce involves a lot of legalities, such as the maintenance and division of properties and other liabilities. For this reason, getting a lawyer and paying the appropriate fees is not out of the question. Uncontested divorce, on the other hand, can be successfully done even without the help of attorneys, minimizing your financial costs.

Faster Processes
Since uncontested divorce basically involves agreeing parties, the legal process takes less paperwork, and therefore, less time to accomplish and approve. There are also instances where a court proceeding is not required, again saving you from the financial costs of courts and lost time at work. You cannot say the same regarding contested divorce, as the disagreements require settlements and more paperwork.

Less Errors
Less paperwork means less legal matters to attend to and fewer chances of committing a mistake. Again, this makes the entire process cheaper and faster, not to mention that it prevents multiple meetings with the opposing party, which could be beneficial in the long run.

Less Hard Feelings
One of the most overlooked benefits of uncontested divorce is the fact that it often ends up with less hard feelings between the parties involved, because of the lack of disagreements in assets and liabilities. According to the website of the Austin divorce attorneys of Kirker Davis LLP, contested divorces can be emotionally taxing. Couples may feel the need to “win” the divorce as an act of anger or revenge, resulting into lengthy and expensive proceedings.